Starting a ‘Right’ Business??

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Do you dream of the day you can start your own business? Take control of the reins, set your own schedule and make your own decisions?

In these days of economic uncertainty when layoffs and unemployment rates dominate the news, the idea of starting a business no longer seems all that much riskier than the traditional nine-to-five office job.

Now that you’ve decided to take the plunge into entrepreneurial life, do you know how to choose the type of business that’s right for you? What industry and business would make the best use of your specific abilities and assets? Here are six tips for selecting the business that’s right for you:

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Linux Command Sudo vs SU

The sudo command

sudo – execute a command as another user

sudo -V | -h | -l | -L | -v | -k | -K | -s | [ -H ] [-P ] [-S ] [ -b ] | [ -p prompt ] [ -c class| ] [ -a auth_type ] [ -u username|#uid ] command

DESCRIPTION

sudo allows a permitted user to execute a command as the superuser or another user, as specified in the sudoers file. The real and effective uid and gid are set to match those of the target user as specified in the passwd file (the group vector is also initialized when the target user is not root). By default, sudo requires that users authenticate themselves with a password (NOTE: by default this is the user’s password, not the root password). Once a user has been authenticated, a timestamp is updated and the user may then use sudo without a password for a short period of time (5
minutes unless overridden in sudoers).

sudo determines who is an authorized user by consulting the file /etc/sudoers. By giving sudo the -v flag a user can update the time stamp without running a command. The password prompt itself will also time out if the user’s password is not entered within 5
minutes (unless overridden via sudoers).

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10 Tips for Ubuntu Newbies.

Ubuntu has become the most popular Linux distribution for new Linux users. It’s easy to install, easy to use, and usually “just works.” But moving to a different operating system can be confusing, no matter how well-designed it is. Here’s a list of tips that might save you some time while you’re getting used to Ubuntu.

1. Getting multimedia to work

The default Ubuntu install contains free software only, which means that it doesn’t support some popular multimedia formats straight out of the box. This is inconvenient, but the Ubuntu folks have good reasons for not shipping with support for MP3, DVDs, and so forth — including that software could cause them some legal headaches, or incur some serious fees.

Fortunately, as a user, you don’t need to worry about fees (though some of the packages may not be legal due to patent restrictions or restrictions on circumventing copy protection, depending on where you live). The Ubuntu wiki has a page on restricted formats that explains how to get the packages you need. However, if you run Ubuntu on AMD64 or PowerPC hardware, you’ll still be out in the cold for some of the packages, since some multimedia formats depend on proprietary software that’s not available for those hardware platforms.
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