What is Sustainable Agriculture?

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Agriculture has changed dramatically, especially since the end of World War II. Food and fiber productivity soared due to new technologies, mechanization, increased chemical use, specialization and government policies that favored maximizing production. These changes allowed fewer farmers with reduced labor demands to produce the majority of the food and fiber in the U.S.

Although these changes have had many positive effects and reduced many risks in farming, there have also been significant costs.Prominent among these are topsoil depletion, groundwater contamination, the decline of family farms, continued neglect of the living and working conditions for farm laborers, increasing costs of production, and the disintegration of economic and social conditions in rural communities.

A growing movement has emerged during the past two decades to question the role of the agricultural establishment in promoting practices that contribute to these social problems. Today this movement for sustainable agriculture is garnering increasing support and acceptance within mainstream agriculture. Not only does sustainable agriculture address many environmental and social concerns, but it offers innovative and economically viable opportunities for growers, laborers, consumers, policymakers and many others in the entire food system.

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Biodiversity Conservation in terrestrial, marine and aquatic environments.

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I have found many organizations in the world including the government and non-government agencies that providing some information about biodiversity conservation in terrestrial, marine and aquatic environments. Some of them have the same needs or the same point of view to conserve what they really love about, such as the aquatic warbler.

The Aquatic Warbler Acrocephalus paludicola is the rarest and the only globally threatened passerine bird found in mainland Europe. The species is classified as Vulnerable at global level and is listed as Vulnerable in the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. At the European level it is classified as Endangered. It is also included into Annex I of the EU Wild Birds Directive, in Appendix II of the Bern Convention and in Appendix I of the Bonn Convention.

The Aquatic Warbler regularly breeds in Belarus, Germany, Hungary, Lithuania, Poland and Ukraine (irregularly in Russia and Latvia), with major populations in Belarus, Ukraine, and Poland. The breeding distribution is fragmented because of habitat constraints. The species became extinct in Western Europe during the 20th century and has declined dramatically in central Europe. It formerly bred in France, Belgium, Netherlands, former West Germany, former Czechoslovakia, former Yugoslavia, Austria and Italy. Continue reading