You’ll Never Send Things To Friends The Same Way Again | PushBullet Blog

You’ll Never Send Things To Friends The Same Way Again | PushBullet Blog.

By  on November 05, 2013

You can now add and push to friends with Pushbullet, making Pushbullet the fastest and easiest way to share links, files, and more, directly with your friends.

Why is Pushbullet better than other ways of sharing? Because we’ve made it possible to send almost anything directly to a friend, without anything getting in the way. Here are a couple examples of why this is better than email:

  • By pushing a link directly to a friend instead of emailing it to them, they’ll instantly get a notification about the link and going to that link is as easy as tapping on the notification (as opposed to having to go and find it in their inbox). Cool.

  • Sending a picture or file to someone shouldn’t mean attaching it to a blank email. With Pushbullet, you simply send the picture or file right to them. They can then start downloading instantly by tapping the notification. So much easier.

This is awesome, how do I get started?

Once you’ve installed or updated the Pushbullet Android app, you’ll see this message on the top of the screen. Tapping on the message will take you to a list of your contacts, where you can select those you want to be able to push to. Tapping on the X icon will dismiss the message forever.

After selecting your friends and pressing the send icon, those you’ve highlighted will be added as your friends on Pushbullet. You’ll then be able to start pushing to them right away. Those that don’t already have a Pushbullet account will get an invitation to join.

You can also add friends by entering their email address in the Android app or here on pushbullet.com.

Once you’ve added someone as a friend, pushing to them is easy.

All of your friends on Pushbullet are shown as options that can be pushed to using the updated Android appChrome extension, and Firefox extension (or via pushbullet.com). This makes sending something to a friend incredibly simple—just select the person you want to send it to and away it goes.

What happens when I push something to a friend?

They’ll instantly receive a notification on all of their Pushbullet devices. This notification will be smart—links will open in their browser, addresses in Google Map, etc, just like the notifications for pushes to your own devices. Then, once they’ve dismissed the notification on any one of their devices, we automatically dismiss it on all of the rest. This means they’ll never be annoyed seeing the same notification multiple times.

What if I push something to someone who hasn’t signed up yet?

If the person you’ve pushed to doesn’t have a Pushbullet account, we resort to sending it to them as an email. They’ll be able to see whatever you’ve pushed them right from this emailwithout having to sign up first. This is important because it means you don’t have to worry about whether or not they have Pushbullet before you send them something–they’ll get it no matter what.

What if my friend has an iPhone?

We don’t have an iOS app right now but we are working on it. In the mean time, those using iOS can still install our Chrome extension to be able to send and receive pushes on their computer.

If you’re waiting for our iOS app and want to get updates as development progresses (and potentially help us test it before release), you can subscribe to updates here.

What comes next?

These new features are huge step forward in the evolution of Pushbullet. To see people start using us to share things with friends is incredibly exciting and we’re really looking forward to hearing what’s great about it and what we can make better. Our plan for the next couple weeks is to react as quickly as we can to feedback in order to improve this new component of Pushbullet.

Will Smart Machine Create a World without Work?

Paul Wiseman and Bernard Condon, The Associated Press, Washington | World | Fri, January 25 2013, 12:22 PM

They seem right out of a Hollywood fantasy, and they are: Cars that drive themselves have appeared in movies like “I, Robot” and the television show “Knight Rider.”

Now, three years after Google invented one, automated cars could be on their way to a freeway near you. In the US, California and other states are rewriting the rules of the road to make way for driverless cars. Just one problem: What happens to the millions of people who make a living driving cars and trucks —jobs that always have seemed sheltered from the onslaught of technology?

“All those jobs are going to disappear in the next 25 years,” predicts Moshe Vardi, a computer scientist at Rice University in Houston. “Driving by people will look quaint; it will look like a horse and buggy.”

If automation can unseat bus drivers, urban deliverymen, long-haul truckers, even cabbies, is any job safe?

Vardi poses an equally scary question: “Are we prepared for an economy in which 50 percent of people aren’t working?”
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Starting a ‘Right’ Business??

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Do you dream of the day you can start your own business? Take control of the reins, set your own schedule and make your own decisions?

In these days of economic uncertainty when layoffs and unemployment rates dominate the news, the idea of starting a business no longer seems all that much riskier than the traditional nine-to-five office job.

Now that you’ve decided to take the plunge into entrepreneurial life, do you know how to choose the type of business that’s right for you? What industry and business would make the best use of your specific abilities and assets? Here are six tips for selecting the business that’s right for you:

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10 Tips for Ubuntu Newbies.

Ubuntu has become the most popular Linux distribution for new Linux users. It’s easy to install, easy to use, and usually “just works.” But moving to a different operating system can be confusing, no matter how well-designed it is. Here’s a list of tips that might save you some time while you’re getting used to Ubuntu.

1. Getting multimedia to work

The default Ubuntu install contains free software only, which means that it doesn’t support some popular multimedia formats straight out of the box. This is inconvenient, but the Ubuntu folks have good reasons for not shipping with support for MP3, DVDs, and so forth — including that software could cause them some legal headaches, or incur some serious fees.

Fortunately, as a user, you don’t need to worry about fees (though some of the packages may not be legal due to patent restrictions or restrictions on circumventing copy protection, depending on where you live). The Ubuntu wiki has a page on restricted formats that explains how to get the packages you need. However, if you run Ubuntu on AMD64 or PowerPC hardware, you’ll still be out in the cold for some of the packages, since some multimedia formats depend on proprietary software that’s not available for those hardware platforms.
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